Agenda

As a live agenda, these sessions are subject to change. Check in frequently for updates.
All sessions appear as Pacific Time. 

All speakers, moderators, and planners have no actual or potential conflict of interest in relation to this program/presentation.

This activity has been submitted to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for approval to award contact hours. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses is accredited as an approver of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Plenary -  A general-audience session. 

On-Demand -
 A session that has been prerecorded and is available during the conference.

Workshop - Interactive session to help participants develop specific skills. Limited to a fixed amount of attendees.

Panel Discussion - Features a designated moderator and a panel of 3 to 5 speakers.

Live Lecture - Provides information and solutions that attendees can adapt to their own work and communities.

Connection Café - One hour Zoom meetings where participants can connect and exchange ideas.

Pre-conference Sessions

Wednesday, April 14th

9:00 am – 10:00 am (PT)

Health Literacy and Systemic Racism: Addressing Oppression Through Clear Communication

Live Lecture

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Cliff Coleman, MD, MPH
Oregon Health & Science University

Low baseline health literacy disproportionately affects communities of color. This includes 58% Black Americans, 66% Hispanic Americans, and 48% American Indian/ Alaska Natives. We can compare this to 31% and 28% of Asian and White Americans, respectively. Schools of the health professions have not adequately incorporated health literacy and clear communication into their curricula. This system-wide failure contributes significantly to systemic racism in healthcare, yet has received little attention from health literacy advocates. This talk spotlights health information inequities, and provides a vision for an anti-racist approach to communications training in schools of the health professions.

Objectives:

  • Define systemic racism.
  • Discuss ways that failing to improve communication contributes to systemic racism
  • Identify opportunities for employing anti-racist approaches to one’s health literacy work.

Wednesday, April 21st

9:00 am – 10:00 am (PT)

Visual Dissemination: How To Create Visuals To Help Get Your Research Findings out to the Public Using Free or Low-cost Tools

Workshop

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Tracy Mehan, MA
Nationwide Children’s Hospital

As public health practitioners, we want information from our research/programs to benefit the populations with whom we work. But, too many of us haven’t been taught how to translate our work into visuals. This workshop is for beginners who want to start thinking about how visuals can help them promote their work. Attendees will learn about resources that will help them design everything from social graphics, to infographics, to visual abstracts. The presentation will also include live demos of several programs that are free or low cost.

Objectives:

  • Identify and use free and low-cost programs to design visuals for dissemination.
  • Create images that can be used on social media, on websites, in presentations, or on posters.
  • Know when attribution is required when selecting photos/icons, and how to do it.

Wednesday, May 5th

9:00 am – 10:00 am (PT)

Multi-level Health Literacy Assessment: Families With Young Children With Complex Needs

Live Lecture

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Lindsay Rosenfeld, ScD, ScM
Brandeis University

Jonathan S. Litt, MD, MPH, ScD
Beth Israel Deazoness Medical Center

A multi-level health literacy assessment was performed in a follow-through clinic at an urban, quaternary Children’s Hospital. This facility provides medical and developmental evaluation, as well as support for post-NICU stay. In this unique setting, we evaluated six materials with the SMOG, PEMAT (P, A/V), PMOSE/IKIRSCH, CDC Index, and various other guidelines. We also assessed the environment using The Walking Interview and the Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers (Version2). Further, we conducted interviews with families, staff, and key informants. We uncovered extensive clinic-level barriers that place unnecessary burden on families as they navigate optimal care for their children with complex needs.

Objectives:

  • Define health literacy and the components of a health literacy assessment.
  • Identify appropriate assessment measures, tools, and guidelines for your own health literacy assessment.
  • Explain how to use assessment findings to create recommendations and evaluate implementation.

Wednesday, May 19th

9:00 am – 10:00 am (PT)

Addressing Health Disparities: What Health Partners and Adult Educators Can Do Together

Live Lecture

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Marcia Drew Hohn, EdD
Independent Consultant
Janet Ohene-Frempong, MS
Strategic Partner
Greg Smith, MS
Florida Literacy Coalition
Paul Jurmo, EdD
Basic Skills for Development


Adult educators and health partners have developed strategies to help adults with limited basic skills. Having assistance with oral and written English, numeracy, and other communication, problem-solving, and collaboration skills can help strengthen their health, as well as that of their families and communities. After an overview of why and how adult education programs and health partners might collaborate, we'll describe various types of partnerships. We'll respond to participant questions and comments, and suggest follow-up actions participants might take on these interwoven issues of health, education, and social justice.

Objectives:

  • Better understand how public health, adult basic skills, social justice, and poverty interrelate.
  • Better understand why and how adult educators and public health supporters can collaborate.
  • Know how to access resource persons and further information on this topic.

Conference

Live Sessions
These are scheduled live sessions. All sessions will be recorded and made available within 24 hours on the conference platform.

Tuesday, May 25th

8:00 am – 9:45 am (PT)

Opening Remarks

Literacy Tests and the Modern Day Jim Crow

Plenary

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Ray Block, PhD
Pennsylvania State University

This session makes comparison of literacy tests to vote and literacy tests to access COVID vaccine.

Objective:

  • State at least 2 ways current rules and procedures are causing inequities in vaccine distribution.


Health Literacy in Support of Equity: Removing Barriers to Increase Access to Care

Plenary

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Moderator – Lezlee Matthews, PhD, MA
Lezlee Matthews Consulting

Emily K. Brunson, PhD, MPH
CommuniVax

Jacinda Abdul-Mutakabbir, PharmD
Loma Linda University

Jerry Abraham, MD
Kedren Community Health Center

The pandemic disproportionally affected communities that have already had long-standing inequitable access to healthcare. Using examples drawn from COVID-19 vaccine distribution, speakers will discuss how to identify and remove barriers, and how this can help mitigate vaccine hesitancy and increase accessibility to information, services, and care during and beyond the pandemic.

Objectives:

  • Identify current barriers to equitable access to vaccines.
  • State at least three ways to improve communication with their intended audiences.
  • Provide at least three examples of how to increase access to health services.
  • List at least three improvements the healthcare system can make to prepare for future disasters.

10:00 am – 11:00 am (PT)

Librarians Partner With The Juntos Center for Advancing Latino Health To Provide Credible Health Information

Live Lecture

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Brenda Linares, MLIS, MBA, AHIP
University of Kansas Medical Center

To address the increasing use of social media and digital technologies within the Latinx community, the JUNTOS Health Literacy project seeks to reach out to this community via recorded Spanish-language health educational programs (e.g., podcasts) complemented with evidence-based, Spanish language consumer health information. This project is a collaboration of librarians, community organizers, and health care professionals. The goal is to address health information needs within the Latinx community and connect them with health literacy skill-building tools and easy to understand health information and resources. The podcast segments created through this project include interviews with Spanish-speaking health professionals, updates on relevant health research in plain language, and storytelling from community members sharing health-related experiences and resources.

Objectives:

  • Explore the use of podcasts and other social media outlets to provide health information services to the Spanish-speaking community.
  • Identify best practices for promoting credible health information resources on relevant topics.
  • Learn about funding opportunities to promote health literacy and credible health information.

10:00 am – 11:30 am (PT)

Innovate To Communicate: Health Literacy Workforce Development

*Session limited to the first 60 attendees on a first come first served basis.

Workshop

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Carol Howe, PhD, RN, CDCES, FAAN
Texas Christian University

Tracine Adame, BSN, RN, LSSGB
Medical City Dallas

Teresa Wagner, DrPH, MS, CPH, RD/LD, CHWI, DipACLM, CHWC
University of North Texas Health Science Center 

Ashley Franklin, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE-A
Texas Christian University

*Session limited to the first 60 registered attendees.

Innovate to Communicate workshop will teach you how to: 1)comunicate using evidence based health literacy practices e.g. plain language, chunking information, teachback; 2) focus attention and ways to integrate health literacy into structures, processes, and quality measures; and 3) effectively use health literacy resources to promote a health literacy organization.

Objectives:

  • List action steps necessay to become a leader in health ltieracy at thier organization.
  • Demonstrate at least 2 health literacy best practices for effective communication.

11:15 am – 12:15 pm (PT)

Healthy Content Matters: Bringing Patient Education Online

Live Lecture

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Kristen Gosse, M.Ed., BA
InJoy Health Education

Historically, topics such as childbirth, postpartum health, newborn care, breastfeeding, and parenting have been taught in a traditional classroom setting or one-on-one with a health educator. And although those topics had taken tentative steps into the digital realm, COVID-19, abruptly, has forced them into going virtual. Fortunately, the timing couldn’t be better. Today’s new parents are comfortable with e-learning. More than any other, this demographic is prepared to get their childbirth and parenting information online. But there is a challenge: they have high expectations and short attention spans. With a seemingly unlimited supply of information, parents can become overwhelmed. And because so much of that content is unreliable, they become frustrated. How, then, do you design an online learning experience that’s effective, efficient, and engaging? How do you create an experience that empowers users to make informed healthcare decisions? By providing insights and tips for developing a wide range of online materials, this session will show you how. You’ll learn about the importance of human-centered design, adult learning theory, and health literacy. And while this presentation focuses on maternal-child education solutions, the content is readily transferrable to other areas of health education.

Objectives:

  • Understand how to create an online learning experience that incorporates health literacy standards, adult learning theory, and human-centered design.
  • Explain the importance of human-centered design, health literacy, and adult learning theory to online patient education.
  • Give examples of effective e-learning experiences for patient education.
  • Identify differences between effective content and ineffective content.

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (PT)

Creating a COVID-19 Patient and Family Education Website: When Marketing, a Vendor, and a Patient and Family

*Session limited to the first 30 attendees on a first come first served basis.

Workshop

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Jenny Shaffer, RN, BSN
Angie Lucia

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Creating patient and family education materials that are easy to read and understand is always vital—but even more so during a pandemic. Maintaining those materials and making them accessible, however, has been a challenge. To address this issue, The Office of Patient and Family Education and Health Literacy at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford partnered with Marketing and our patient instruction vendor to develop an engaging, accessible, and search-friendly website. In this session, we’ll discuss our process as well as lessons learned. From this experience, you will gain insights about search engine optimization and options to improve your own website.

Objectives:

  • Understand how to create an effective partnership among Marketing, education vendors, and clinical staff.
  • Identify the key elements of patient and family education content that is optimized for search engines.
  • Describe the importance of making health education accessible to everyone.

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm (PT)

Integrating Patient Stories in Health Literacy Training

Live Lecture

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Farrah Schwartz, MA
Sophia Wong, MD, MScAH, CCRP
Jack Ireland
University Health Network

Healthcare providers become more engaged and derive greater meaning when patient perspectives and stories are incorporated into the curriculum. At UHN, we leveraged this principle by integrating authentic patient perspectives into the development of our patient stories video series.
This session will outline our video-development process, and will describe how videos are used to train UHN providers and staff. We will also discuss evaluation results and opportunities for you to incorporate patient perspectives into your own health literacy education materials.

Objectives:

  • Describe the benefit of incorporating patient stories into education for healthcare providers.
  • Create meaningful patient stories to achieve valuable impact.
  • Identify 1-3 effective ways to integrate patient stories into education for healthcare providers.

Wednesday, May 26th

8:00 am – 8:15 am (PT)

Building Connections for Equity Through Health Literacy Collaboration and Action

Plenary

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Diana Gonzalez, MPH, CHES
Institute for Healthcare Advancement

This session will highlight the importance of connecting virtually with people around the country to apply health literacy in order to build equity and trust..

Objectives:

  • Understand additional ways to earn CEUs by attending pre-recorded sessions.
  • Identify opportunities to network with practitioners and/or researchers.

8:30 am – 9:30 am (PT)

Teaching About a Pandemic During a Pandemic: Health, Science, Civic, and Fundamental Literacy on a Virtual Platform

*Number of attendees may be limited.

Connection Café

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Doris Ravotas, PhD
Western Michigan University

This interactive session is based on lessons learned while teaching English language and literacy learners about COVID-19 on a virtual platform during the pandemic. The cafe will be appropriate for anyone who is teaching health (not just to language and literacy learners). It will be an opportunity for the audience to discuss areas of concern in both teaching online and teaching the most relevant COVID-19 information.

Objectives:

  • Discuss challenges of misinformation and solutions to steer learners to reliable sources.
  • Explore ways scientific and civic literacy can be incorporated into public educational programs (such as pandemics).
  • Discuss virtual learning environments and gather tips to best engage learners.

9:45 am – 10:45 am (PT)

Connecting SDOH and Health Literacy Through a Discreet Privilege Activity

Connection Café

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Lauri DeRuiter-Willems, PhD
Jennifer Cannon, MS, CHES
Eastern Illinois University

A privilege walk may prove beneficial in a couple of ways. It raises your awareness of your own conditions, privilege, or marginalization. It also increases your understanding of the realities (the access or obstacles) of SDOH. Participation can generate strong emotions. Our modified privilege activity affords anonymity and privacy while still allowing students to relate SDOH to their own lives. This session will explain how SDOH and privilege are a base for studying health equity and disparities. This perspective is important to fully address health literacy. We will share our experience, the debriefing with students, and conversations about bias and racism of marginalized groups.

Objectives:

  • Understand the connections of social determinants of health and privilege to health literacy concepts.
  • Understand how to integrate the modified privilege activity in your own work to increase understanding of SDOH as an important component of health literacy practice.
  • Be prepared to facilitate a session including a modified privilege activity and discussion of health equity, disparities, health literacy, bias, and racism.

11:00 am – 12:00 pm (PT)

Health Literacy in Canada

*Session limited to the first 50 attendees on a first come first served basis.

Connection Café

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Farrah Schwartz, MA
Sophia Wong, MD, MScAH, CCRP
University Health Network

This connection cafe will be a networking and discussion session for health literacy practitioners based in Canada. Participants will discuss the landscape of their own organizations and provinces, as well as that of others who champion health literacy work. This session will provide a forum for members from the Canadian Health Literacy and Patient Education Network (CHLPEN) and non-members to discuss learning needs, share best practices, and identify opportunities in the Canadian context.

Objectives:

  • Describe other health literacy work taking place nationally or provincially in Canada.
  • Connect with 1-3 other individuals who are working in the health literacy field in Canada.
  • Identify opportunities for future collaboration or learning at the local/national level.

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm (PT)

Interactive ePoster Session


12:30 pm – 1:30 pm (PT)

Live Exhibitor Hall

Thursday, May 27th

8:00 am – 9:15 am (PT)

Changes Ahead: No Return to the Old Normal

Plenary

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Moderator – Cynthia Baur, PhD
University of Maryland

Neal Sikka, MD
George Washington University

April Joy Damian, PhD, MSc, CHPM, PMP
Weitzman Institute

This ‘Contagion Year’ revealed troublesome inequities, yielded important insights, and pushed new approaches into being. As we move forward beyond the current crisis, we must consider how to establish a ‘new normal’. This morning we briefly explore two of the many important issues, one technological and one behavioral, each with implications for equity and each carrying opportunities for efficacious change.

Objectives:

  • Note at least two challenges communities face as a result of our greater reliance on technology.
  • Identify at least two innovative and equitable approaches to new technological applications.
  • State at least two challenges individuals have faced during these stressful times.
  • Provide at least two examples of innovative and equitable approaches to improve access to mental health services.

9:30 am – 10:30 am (PT)

Best Practices in Image-Based Health Communication

Live Lecture

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Kathleen Walker, BA
David Pearl

CommunicateHealth

A pictogram is a powerful tool that can help health communicators provide a clear visual representation of complex concepts. They're especially important in reaching people with limited literacy, people with reading or cognitive disabilities, and people who aren't fluent in the language the material is written in. In this session, we'll share best practices for creating effective pictograms. We’ll show examples of campaigns and products that successfully used pictograms to communicate a wide range of health concepts. And, finally, we’ll discuss the role of pictograms as part of a broader strategy for accessible and inclusive design.

Objectives:

  • Explain the benefits of using pictograms in public health communications.
  • Describe how pictograms support health literacy in multi-cultural communications.
  • Name best practices in designing pictograms.

9:30 am – 11:00 am (PT)

Ask Dr. Google: Finding Information You Can Trust

Session limited to the first 40 attendees on a first come first served basis.

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

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Caitlyn Mowatt
Wisconsin Health Literacy

The program is designed to explore digital health literacy. During this interactive, hands-on workshop, you will learn how to confidently navigate online resources, and how to help others find reliable health information.

Objectives:

  • Understand how to judge the reliability of health information searches.
  • Be confident to teach these skills to others.
  • Understand how to identify health resources that are effective and evidenced-based.

10:45 am – 11:45 pm (PT)

Recruiting Participants and Promoting Participation: Health Literacy's Role in Achieving Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Clinical Trials

Panel Discussion

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Becky Johnson, PhD, MPH
IQVIA
Michelle D’Abundo, PhD, MSH, CHES, ELI-MP, CPC

Seton Hall University
Blizzard Michael, BA, MS, Doctoral Candidate 
New Jersey Urology
Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH

The MRCT Center of Brigham and Women & Hospital and Harvard

A disproportionate number of racially and ethnically diverse people have limited health literacy, decreasing their ability to find, use, and act on health information. Evidenced-based barriers to healthcare access and navigation are further complicated by limited knowledge of chronic disease. These factors contribute to the underrepresentation of minority populations in clinical trials—trials that play an essential role in improving health outcomes. Because systemic health literacy prevents patients from participating in research, this demographic is historically underrepresented. From this perspective, we’ll discuss ways to improve patient access to clinical trials.

Objectives:

  • Understand and apply health literacy best practices for improving clinical trial awareness and access, as well as patient adherence and self-management during a clinical trial.
  • Foster greater understanding of low health literacy’s role as a barrier to clinical trial participation among racially and ethnically diverse populations.
  • Present strategies for improving access to clinical trials among diverse populations by addressing systemic health literacy barriers.
  • Elucidate the role of health literacy best practices in improving clinical trial recruitment, retention, and patient adherence and self-management during a clinical trial.

11:30 am – 1:00 pm (PT)

Always Use Teach-back! Now More than Ever

*Session is limited to the first 50 attendees on a first come first served basis.

Workshop

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Mary Ann Abrams, MD, MPH
Nationwide Children’s Hospital

This interactive session will equip participants with knowledge, skills, tools, and resources to foster routine use of teach-back and organizational health literacy. Teach-back helps promote adherence, quality, safety, equity, and patient-centered care. The Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit was created to support individual and organizational improvement in appropriate use of teach-back whenever it is indicated—making it an always event. Through presentation, group discussion, and exploration of Toolkit components, participants will be prepared to develop a teach-back-oriented organizational health literacy plan tailored for their setting.

Objectives:

  • Describe how teach-back and organizational health literacy are key to safe, high-quality, equitable care, especially in the time of COVID.
  • Identify key components of the Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit.
  • Plan next steps to increase use of teach-back in your setting.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm (PT)

Health Literacy in Action: Helping English Language Learners Improve Health Literacy Knowledge and Skills

Live Lecture

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Heather Surrency, MPH
Greg Smith, MS

Florida Literacy Coalition

Literacy is an essential component of health equity and the basis of health literacy. Without language, reading comprehension, and numeracy skills, patients often struggle to understand and act on health recommendations. The Florida Health Literacy Initiative is an award-winning program that, over the last ten years, has provided health literacy instruction to more than 20,000 adult learners. This session will focus on the lessons the Florida Health Literacy Initiative learned, and will demonstrate how these experiences are relevant to health literacy practitioners in a variety of fields. We will also examine how adult education organizations can be valuable partners with health providers, health educators, and public health agencies.

Objectives:

  • Identify key health literacy needs of adult learners and others with low literacy.
  • Describe the components of an effective health literacy curriculum for patients with low literacy.
  • List at least one educational strategy you can implement within your organization to improve patients’ skills, knowledge, or confidence.

1:15 pm – 1:30 pm (PT)

Conference Coda

Plenary

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Rima Rudd, ScD
Harvard University
Michael Villaire, MSLM
Diana Gonzalez, MPH, CHES

Institute for Healthcare Advancement

On-Demand Sessions

These sessions are prerecorded. Starting May 19th, you can watch these sessions and interact with the speaker using a discussion feature on the conference platform.

The Importance of Public Libraries Role in Health Literacy Promotion

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Kiara Comfort MLIS
David M. Brown EdD, MLIS, MCHES
Network for he National Library of Medicine


This presentation investigates how the public library can be engaged in the promotion of health literacy. In this presentation we will discuss the role public libraries have in promoting health literacy to its patrons. We will also discuss the importance of having public library staff who have the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) and how they can be health literacy navigators for patrons. This presentation will discuss the importance of public libraries partnering with outside groups (including NNLM) to create partnerships and programming to promote health literacy and reduce health disparities in the United States.


Building Health Literacy Awareness in Mexico - Pilot Process and the Future

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Russel Bennett, MBA, CHIE
Institute for Healthcare Advancement Consultant
Hari Camino, BA
Satya Social Purpose Communication Studio 


This session will discuss a Public-Private Collaboration in Mexico, between ISSEMyM, a Government Health System in the State of Mexico. By adapting IHA materials, "What to do when your child is sick," book, for Cultural Competency and Regulatory Compliance in Mexico, this program developed operational solutions for distribution, training of health professionals, and interviewing new parents for determination of acceptance and results. It will discuss utilizing Health Literacy in a foreign country where it is a relatively new and untested concept.


Science of Reading and Understanding Explains Plain Language Guidelines

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Cheryl M. Stephens, JD
Plain Language Wizardry


With many new tools available for brain research, we know the steps of the reading process and how to facilitate reader understanding. Research shows the less work audiences need to put into reading, the more they will find sources credible, and the better they will connect with the messages. Readers balance effort required with information gained. Then they decide how they feel about the messenger and whether the message is credible and trustworthy.


Health Literacy Policy for People-Centered Care in the OECD Countries

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Santosh Kumar Mishra


With regards to objectives, this research paper aims to investigate into HL policies the OECD countries have devised to help steer individuals’ behavior in the right direction. More specifically, strategies that encourage and prioritize “people-centered care” have been looked into. Suggested strategies for furthering HL in the OECD countries have also been presented. In terms of methodology, secondary data (mostly ‘qualitative’ in nature) has been used in the work. Nature of data analysis is ‘descriptive’, involving “desk-based research”. Examples of appropriate HL initiatives have been quoted in the work.


Health Literacy 101 - An Introduction to the Field

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Michael Villaire, MSLM
Institute for Healthcare Advancement


This workshop will provide an overview of the scope of low health literacy, including frequencies among the general population, general characteristics, abilities and challenges of persons with low health literacy, and the cost of poor health literacy (both in terms of human suffering and dollars). Strategies for making individual and system-based improvements to improve health communication will be discussed.


Promoting health literacy for marginalized communities in a pandemic: Education, engagement, and access barriers among Yezidi refugees in the Midwest

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Megan Kelley PhD, CHES
Falah N. Rashoka, MS, CPH, BSN
University of Nebraska-Lincoln


This presentation summarizes lessons learned from a community-based research project to understand and address barriers to healthcare access among Yezidi refugees living in the Midwest. Focus groups with Yezidi community members, social service workers, and healthcare providers revealed structural and experiential access barriers. We built on these findings by partnering with our Community Advisory Board to develop educational interventions for healthcare providers and the Yezidi community. We present an ecological approach to address barriers to healthcare access for Yezidi refugees, describe how we navigated methodological challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, and share upcoming steps in our ongoing project.


Health Literacy Programming With Your Public Library

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Rebecca Antill
Jennifer Jean
South Carolina State Library


Partnering with public libraries and other community organizations statewide, the South Carolina State Library expanded outreach to rural communities by using local health partners and small transportable kitchen kits to demonstrate healthy cooking and living strategies. Lack of education in rural areas often shows a direct correlation to poor health practices that affect entire families. However, we believe that healthy changes can be made when people are encouraged to make small consistent alterations with lots of positive feedback, such as a library program that gives small bits of information in plain language. This session will describe our successes and challenges.